JUZD Organic Bamboo Clothing

I came across a really interesting streetwear concept early in the year – bamboo designer clothing. JUZD is a local brand that has established its line based on the concept of organic bamboo fabric. Want to learn more? Jing Liu, JUZD’s Lead Designer, takes us through the ins and outs of the brand.

  1. Tell us about JUZD – how could we describe it in 10 words and under?
  2. JUZD is the planet’s first bamboo designer clothing.

  3. The brand just launched in March 2008, where has JUZD taken us so far?
  4. The most innovative fabric in over 50 years. The founders of a clothing store chain which now has several hundred locations felt the fabric and was very impressed. These guys have been in the industry for over 50 years and are impressed by NOTHING.

  5. Where did the concept of Bamboo Clothing arise?
  6. The reason I started JUZD was I wanted a clothing label that represented nature and the raw power the human being. There is no line out there that paid respect to nature and us as humans. With that as the founding concept I wanted a fabric that was organic and natural. And growing up in China my subconscious was imprinted with imageries of luscious, green, beautiful bamboos. With all this in my subconscious when my friend told me about bamboo fabric, it felt so right. It’s like one of those moments when you meet your soul mate or discover your true passion in life.

  7. Are there any big names that we can find organic bamboo being used?
  8. The big names that use bamboo are Roots, Lululemon, and now Affliction. Personally I really don’t like their bamboos. It’s an older generation so it’s heavy clingy, and not as soft as our bamboo. I guess I’ve been spoiled with the JUZD bamboo. No one else has the JUZD bamboo because its custom designed and milled.

  9. What does street wear mean in Toronto?
  10. There are some very fashion forward and creative individuals in Toronto but there are just too few! I remember my trips to California and New York and even China, each person is different and it was accepted. We the Toronto streetwear fashion culture is a follower, dressing mainstream with things from H&M and Zara. Nothing’s wrong with H&M and Zara but the way things are paired up is very safe. I think the Toronto street fashion culture needs to move forward and embrace individual expression.

  11. How do you develop your line to be street wear oriented?
  12. The secret is I’m just an artist looking for an outlet. I just create edgy art and it happens to fit into the street fashion culture.

  13. What is your process like in developing the product?
  14. The process is pretty extensive. Here’s the brief version.
    First I come up with an overall concept for the season that dictates everything. The designs and the colours, this has to match the cultural mood and the season. Then I finalize a small palette of colours and textures to use. Followed by the shirt styles I want for that season. Now comes the most creative challenging part, I have to come up unique concept and designs that match all the elements I’ve chosen. Then I collaborate with artists all across the world that matches the theme I want. In the Fall there’s one shirt that was the collaboration of four artists! The most fun, creative, and challenging element is making sure each shirt has a unique concept that no one has ever seen before, something totally fresh.

  15. The general inclination is towards using organic materials to develop our fashions – how much do you think the eco-consciousness play into the next wave of clothing design?
  16. In one respect I think the innovation of organic fashion is very slow. Designers associate organic with nature and nature with hippies. So all this ‘organic’ clothing is designed for hippies and tree huggers. God bless them but you can’t change society by getting the 3% of the population making conscious decision on their clothing.

    Where I want to go with JUZD and hope the other designers will follow is to make it compete with the major labels such as Diesel, Energie, Christian Audigier, and other contemporary labels. That’s going to be the next wave that will turn the mass market onto sustainable clothing.

  17. What’s the best way to wear your line – how do you style your clothing?
  18. Pair it up with your favourite pair of premium denim. I designed for the full shirt so it’s hard to layer it. Maybe add accessories such as a chain, scarf, or a pair of bad ass shades. But always wear the tees directly against the skin, because it feels so good.

  19. Where are you looking to take the design of the line – how do you reinvent yourselves each season?
  20. With most artists when I create a piece that very creative (and I make sure every piece is) initially I get very excited. I jump I hop and show it to everyone. Then fear hits me hard. It’s like “how am I going to outdo myself next time? Is that my last? Is that all I got? Oh no! I think I exhausted all creative possibilities.”

    But there are always more creative possibilities. I take inspiration from all around me. Whenever I see a design that’s innovative and edgy I think how can I translate that to a shirt. As with the art direction I want to go back to my roots, I want to take it back to Asia.

> check out the full collection at juzdbambo.com

JUZD Organic Bamboo Clothing JUZD Organic Bamboo Clothing JUZD Organic Bamboo Clothing

24 Replies to “Q&A with JUZD Street Wear”
  1. too bad there is a huge logo splashed all over everything! I admire the use of bamboo, but really isn’t it still a disposable t shirt? the graphics and imagery make it too trendy and fast and it would probably be ditched after a season. or sooner. I would be more impressed with an eco fashion line that combined fashion with seasonless classicism AND sustainable fabrics, that can be worn for years to come and won’t end up in a landfull after a couple months.
    In a few years sustainable fabrics will be the norm. To make it in the rag trade, you might need a little more to go on. my opinion.

  2. it’s a cool concept – I’d like to see some play on styles, right now we see t-shirts. What can bamboo do with cardigans, scarves, blouses, etc?

  3. The Quarterhug

    I dont see the point of making the clothes out of bamboo,
    but at least it’s a little different

  4. Hi Sarah,

    Bamboo is still a very new fabric and there are a lot of experimentations going on with it. Coming collections we are experimenting with fleece bamboo to create hoodies.

    I will keep your suggestions in mind. And don’t worry those products are not far behind. 😉 Too bad with fashion it takes a year before a product is ready to when it hits the market.

    -Jing Liu
    JUZD Bamboo

  5. im with adrienne. you hit the nail on the head.

  6. too many street labels doing the same exact shit… everytime i see a new one i just want to puke.

  7. I think it’s tricky getting a street fashion label started – there’s a lot of expectation for there to be play with colour, cuts, and overall presentation. It has to be really original for it to be considered true street style – every brand has a start, maybe it’s good to have a foundation based on a premise.

  8. i feel a lot of street labels get trapped when they try to “copy” what each other is doing. There’s no ground breaking shit or creativity…

    Moreover, the market JUZD has chosen has foretold its death… “Where I want to go with JUZD and hope the other designers will follow is to make it compete with the major labels such as Diesel, Energie, Christian Audigier, and other contemporary labels.”

    Totally the wrong market to compete in. The products are going to end up the exact same. If a brand wants to cater and sell their clothes to brainless euro trash wannabe’s then they were doomed from the start.

  9. Wayne,

    I want to get a couple of things straight here. The market that Diesel, Energie, Christian Audigier caters to is not doomed as they are making quite a bit of money.

    More importantly I said that’s the market I’m after because of their spending habits (their price range of shirts) and their desire for graphic tees. But my stuff does not resemble any of the crap from the other labels. As you can see, it’s a lot cleaner, it’s not layer of crap on top of other layers of crap. Every design and concept is truly original. And there is a concept with each design not random assembly of elements.

    I understand that some may not appreciate this area of fashion/art.

  10. Also want to add we don’t use guns, tattoo, gang bananas, skulls, crosses, graphic picture of me smoking a cigarette (Christian Audigier), and busy all over graphic prints.

    Despite what you think we also made a conscious decision not to have our logo and name all over the shirts which is unheard of for ANY graphic shirt. We only have one shirt that actually says “JUZD” on it.

    Maybe we’re not the typical streetwear label you speak of.

  11. “The market that Diesel, Energie, Christian Audigier caters to is not doomed as they are making quite a bit of money.”

    I did not say the market was doomed. I said your brand is doomed. From a fashion stand point there’s no sustainable differentiator that would want to make me buy your shirts. There’s nothing “next level” about em. Just the same shitty graphic tees brands like affliction put out.

    “But my stuff does not resemble any of the crap from the other labels. As you can see, it’s a lot cleaner, it’s not layer of crap on top of other layers of crap.”

    Tell me what is so innovative about your prints? Instead of layer of crap on top of other layers of crap, its just one layer of crap… that must be it.

    “Also want to add we don’t use guns, tattoo, gang bananas, skulls, crosses, graphic picture of me smoking a cigarette (Christian Audigier), and busy all over graphic prints.”

    So just because you dont litter your shirts with graphic prints and cliche images makes them AWESOME and INNOVATIVE and COOLER?! I don’t get the logic. You’re still not doing anything other street wear labels havent done.

    “Maybe we’re not the typical streetwear label you speak of.”.

    You’re not doing anything creative. You are putting a shitty graphic on a t-shirt. I can put a shitty graphic on t shirt. Thats neither fashion or art. Plz do not use the term “art” for a mere street wear label.

  12. Hey Guys, here’s my take:

    Everyone’s said their piece and this post isn’t meant to be an open forum for bashing nor unwarranted arguments. I can understand why Wayne isn’t JUZD’s biggest fan, and I don’t want there to be growing bad blood on this.

    I appreciate all the feedback, and it’s definitely beneficial for JUZD’s brand to grow to know that perspectives like adrienne’s and Wayne’s are out there.

    Let’s move onto perpetual improvement, thanks!

  13. Ps: Wow you guys are really into commenting, 4-6am? Hardcore.

  14. Thank you for your feedback Wayne. 😀

    For my future collections I will not try to make more crap. I will also try to design my stuff so you don’t puke when you see it.

    -Jing Liu
    JUZD Bamboo

  15. I just checked out the site again – I didn’t know you guys were distributed at Holts, that’s awesome!

  16. Dude, it was totally on the website! 😛

  17. I listed the stores in the early AM guess you saw it several hours later before the NR that was going out in the PM.

    Anyways, we’ll be in Holts for our debut.

    -Jing
    JUZD Bamboo

  18. Great stuff – when’s it in stores?

  19. Dude, you are the biggest hater. It’s been over a year. We’re doing very well, thanks for your passion for the brand.

Leave a Reply